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what is the different meaning of ...

Hi,

The baking bread
The baked bread

What is the different meaning of the above?

Thanh

Re: what is the different meaning of ...

The present participle "baking" and the adjective "baked" are both pre-modifiers of the noun "bread".

Meaning-wise, "The baking bread" has a progressive meaning (the bread is in the process of being baked), for example we might say "Mmm, something smells nice!; it must be the baking bread". By contrast, "The baked bread" has a past meaning, for example we might say "The baked bread I made yesterday is in the cupboard".



PaulM

Is it correct to use a few, a little after such ?

Which of these sentences is correct?
The room is cleaned by her.
The room is cleaned by herself.

Her / herself

The room is cleaned by her / herself.



PaulM

Re: Her / herself

Dear Mr.Matthew.
Thank you for the answer to my question.But you didn't answer my first question.
Is it correct to use "such a few books", "such a little time" ?
Thank you beforehand.

Re: Her / herself

Quote: Fezile
Dear Mr.Matthews.
Thank you for the answer to my question.But you didn't answer my first question.
Is it correct to use "such a few books", "such a little time" ?
Thank you beforehand.

Is it correct to use a few, a little after such ?

They are both okay, but it is usual to omit the article "a" especially before "little time":

Such (a) few books.
Such a little time.



PaulM

PASSIVE VOICE

hELLO,Mr.MATTHEW.

Which verbs can't be used in the Passive Voice? Is there any list?

I only know a few of them:take place,take part,happen,let.Am I right?

Thank you for help.

Re: PASSIVE VOICE

Quote: Fezile
hELLO,Mr.MATTHEW.

Which verbs can't be used in the Passive Voice? Is there any list?

I only know a few of them:take place,take part,happen,let.Am I right?

Thank you for help.



Intransitive verbs cannot be used in the passive voice. I'm sorry, but I don't have a list of them. You can try Google.



PaulM

Re:conjunctio

Hello,Mr.Matthews.
I want to ask you if conj.since can be replaced by because and as.
e.I didn't go to school since I was ill.
.
In another example after or since, maybe both ?
Ann was happy ... she passed the interview.
Thank you.

Re: Re:conjunctio

No, you can't use "since" in its time-reference sense with the simple past tense. It normally requires the perfect tense.

I didn't go haven't been to school since I became ill.
I didn't see haven't seen her since the accident.

"Since" in its sense of reason can be replaced with "because" and "as":

I can't go today, since/because/as I've got to work.
Ann was happy since/because/as she passed the interview


PaulM

Wh questions

1.Can we use who question for animals?




e.g.I fed the qeese.Who/What did I feed?

2."Where" can't be used with the verb visit.Is it so?

noun- forming suffixes

Recently I have met a number of nouns with suffixes -er,-ar etc.I didn't know that they
are derivative nouns.
,e.g.planet,sugar,basket,cement,instrument and so on.IT was given in USEFUL ENGLISH
I DOUBT WHETHER IT IS correct or not.
But I didn,t come across the suffix -ire as in millionaire.Is it a derivative word?

Re: noun- forming suffixes

No, the examples you cite are not derivatives since their endings are not actually suffixes.

"Millionaire" has the suffix -aire found in loanwords from French and which is used to denote someone who has a million pounds or dollars: "million + -aire"

Other examples of loanwords from French include: "concessionaire", "doctrinaire", "commissionaire" "and "legionnaire".



PaulM