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problems with multiple choice sentences

I have problems with the following examples from a multiple choice test:

I can't find the scissors.- They _____________ be in the top drawer.
A.must B.should C... D.......
both answers seem possible to me, the answer key gives only A. as correct.Why?

and

They told me the 2 o'clock flight to Paris was full, but never mind, I _________ the Channel on the ferry.

A.'ll be crossing B...... C.'ll cross D.........

They say C. is the correct answer and I think A. is right, am I wrong?

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

"I can't find the scissors.- They _____________ be in the top drawer."

I would have answered B - should = that's where they are supposed to be/that's where I expect them to be.

I can only see answer A -must, if there are two different speakers:
X; (I've looked in the drawer but) I can't find the scissors.
Y : (What?! But they must be in the top drawer. (That's where I always keep them.)

"They told me the 2 o'clock flight to Paris was full, but never mind, I _________ the Channel on the ferry."

A: I'll be crossing...: I intend to be crossing
If he is booked to go by ferry, why does the speaker even bother mentioning about the 2 o'clock flight? And why is he using the Future Progressive?

c: I'll cross
However - if he was hoping to fly over, but found that the flight was full, then he would say, "...but never mind, I'll cross the Channel by ferry instead."

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Thank you very much indeed!

I suppose the "will" future in the second sentence is the so-called spontaneous decision.

In the first sentence, as the punctuation suggests, there really are 2 speakers. As far as I know, both must and should express likelihood, what is different is the degree of certainty.

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

"the so-called spontaneous decision." I have never heard of 'will' being used to express that.
As you know, 'will' is used to form the Future Tense; and 'will' also expresses 'intention' and 'determination'. Since an intention implies that the action will be performed at a later date, then even when used in that way, it implies the future.

" both must and should express likelihood, what is different is the degree of certainty."
I have to disagree:
'must' does not refer to likelihood. Can you give me a sentence where you think it does? I think you may be misinterpreting sentences like, "It's after 2 p.m. He must be coming soon."

'should' does refers to 'likelihood' in the sense of 'what is probable'.
to indicate what is probable : "The bus should arrive in a few minutes."

to refer to a possible event or situation: Should anyone ring while I'm out, tell them I'll be home after 7."

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Headway for example says "will" expresses spontaneous/also called instant/ decision as opposed to premeditated decision/made before the moment of speaking/ rendered by "going to", New English File, too. They also say "must" expresses probability, which is a degree of likelihood, and some other grammar books even say "must" expresses the highest degree of likelihood, which is certainty, as in

He's always so exhausted, he must have a very demanding job.

Isn't that likelihood?
Possibility, probability and certainty are degrees of likelihood/also called deduction, supposition/, maybe it's a misunderstanding of terms.

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Ahhh...so they're trying to depict the difference between Present Progressive, and Future Tense, as in:
I am going to Hawaii next year.
and
I'll go to Hawaii next year.

...and when and why would we use one, or the other.

I find the dichotomy of 'spontaneous' vs 'premeditated' misleading.
Say I've been thinking about where to go an holiday this year, Hawaii or India. Weighing up different factors, I tell someone:
"I'm going to Hawaii this year, and I'll go to India next year." Here, "I'll go to India" wasn't a spontaneous decision.

As for "...I'll go by ferry."
Look at this :
A : "Oh, you've just missed the bus."
ME: "That's OK. I'll take a No.7. It comes in 5 minutes and drops me only a block from where I want."
We may depict that as a 'spontaneous decision'; but we are not pre-programmed robots - much of what we do during the day is spontaneous.

Again:
"I've decided - I'm going to buy a new car." This would be regarded as 'premeditated'.
compare
"If I win the lottery, I'll buy a new car." That sounds 'premeditated' to me, not 'spontaneous'!

As I said, I think they're trying to depict the difference between Present Progressive, and Future Tense; and I find those terms highly intellectualised, not getting down to the real crux or essence of Present Progressive vs Future Tense, and what determines which we actually say in a situation.
We could talk more about that, or we could talk more about "must".

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

"I'm going to Hawaii this year, and I'll go to India next year."

Here they say the dichotomy is near future/going to=intention/ - distant future/will future, also expressing the idea of 'probably'/. Sorry if I sound too pedantic, but I'm not a native speaker and such rules help.

"If I win the lottery, I'll buy a new car."

This is a typical example of the First conditional and spontaneous/premeditated is not a consideration here.

I'm really enjoying the exchange and I absolutely appreciate the opportunity to look at things from somebody else's viewpoint, it's always enlightening.

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

"I'm going to Hawaii this year, and I'll go to India next year."

"Here they say the dichotomy is near future/going to=intention/ - distant future/will future"

If so, then here?:
Scene: Dr Y's surgery. It is 1.55 p.m. Receptionist has Dr Z on phone wanting a meeting with him at 2 p.m..

Dr (to receptionist): "Tell him I'm going to be busy at 2, but I'll see him at 2.15."
Here, I use the "near future-intention" for 2 p.m....but the "distant future 'will') for 15 minutes later????

Except that it would have strained the bounds of credibility, I might have said: "...I'm going to be busy till 2.01, but I'll see him at 2.02."
"Distant future"?

And these two sentences:
"I'm going to start training today, and I'm going to train every day, and in four years, I'm going to try out for the Olympic Team."

"I'm going to start training today, and I'm going to train every day, and in four years, I'll try out for the Olympic Team."
The 'try-out' for the Olympic Team is the same 4 years away, but I could use either. So what is the difference?

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

The phone's ringing. I'll get it ( correct spontaneous response )

The phone's ringing. I'm going to get it ( incorrect spontaneous response)

Note the use of the contraction: The phone's ringing. This's to keep writing in line with spoken connected speech.

How often have you heard a native English speaker say, The phone is ringing; I am going to get it?

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

PunkproF writes: "How often have you heard a native English speaker say, 'The phone is ringing; I am going to get it.'"
Let's take that further. Would a native speaker respond, "I am going to get it in a day or two/ I'll get it next week."

The point is, the response is not related to time/ the future. Here. 'will' is used to show that someone is willing or ready to do something:
Dr Jones will see you now. (Note the 'now'!)
"The phone's ringing." " I'll get it."

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Quote: PunkproF
The phone's ringing. I'll get it ( correct spontaneous response )

The phone's ringing. I'm going to get it ( incorrect spontaneous response)

Note the use of the contraction: The phone's ringing. This's to keep writing in line with spoken connected speech.

How often have you heard a native English speaker say, The phone is ringing; I am going to get it?



The use of the "will" found in I'll get it is called 'volition', and is the normal response to someone who says The phone's ringing.

It's a particular use of the modal auxiliary verb "will" to indicate varying degrees of intention or willingness, rather than to express futurity as found in the be going to construction.



PaulM

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Yes, yes, yes! They don't need to know the technical terms, just how and when to use them. This is what they need to know:Real English written as it's spoken

Note the use of Schwa /ə/ and the voiced consonant /z/

ə pɪktʃəʳz wɜːʳθ ə θaʊzənd wɜːdz (A picture's worth a thousand words)

Regards

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Quote: PunkproF
Yes, yes, yes! They don't need to know the technical terms, just how and when to use them. This is what they need to know:Real English written as it's spoken

Note the use of Schwa /ə/ and the voiced consonant /z/

ə pɪktʃəʳz wɜːʳθ ə θaʊzənd wɜːdz (A picture's worth a thousand words)

Regards


What rubbish you talk!

When I'm posting answers to help questioners, I'll decide what "they" need to know, not you.

And who is the referent of "they"?

And as for the contraction in "a picture's worth a thousand words" -- it is usually avoided by careful writers who prefer the analytical "a picture is worth ...".



PaulM

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

We usually use contractions in informal writing and speaking.

Who the hell are you to decide who can comment? My comment stands. You need to educate yourself on how informal English is spoken. And, while you're at it, learn some manners. We wouldn't want 'they' to think you had the intelligence of a mule and the manners of a pig.

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/connected-speech

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Quote: PunkproF
We usually use contractions in informal writing and speaking.

Who the hell are you to decide who can comment? My comment stands. You need to educate yourself on how informal English is spoken. And, while you're at it, learn some manners. We wouldn't want 'they' to think you had the intelligence of a mule and the manners of a pig.

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/connected-speech



Oh dear; did I upset "little baby diddums"? Throwing your toys out of the pram if someone tells you off, eh? How childish.

So you think that 'volition' is a 'technical term? Judging by the link you provided to a beginners website, I suppose it would be to someone like you who is clearly a beginner. Oh well, everyone has to start somewhere - it's just a pity you hade to get off on the wrong foot.

And who said anything about my deciding who can comment? If you were capable of reading, you'd have noticed that I said "when I'm posting answers to help questioners, I'll decide ...", i.e. decide how I choose to word my posts.

But it was you who started this by criticising my post, you ignorant twat.

So just **** off you obnoxious **** and don't come back. If you do, I'll see that your IP address is blocked.

Btw, I take it you're a Yank, judging by your loud-mouthed aggressive attitude.


PaulM

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Your IMBIC pentameter is amazing! On reflection, do you regret what you've just written? Did I resort to profanity? Do you think you may have over reacted, just a little?

shall I comPARE thee TO a SUMmer's DAY?

Re: problems with multiple choice sentences

Ps Your writing's crap.